Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and a half percent per year, suddenly it started going up 3% a year as china and india really kicked in. other things being equal, if you change the rate of emission of co2 to the atmosphere, the so-called airborne fraction, the fraction of the co2 that appears in the atmosphere should increase, simply because that quick injection of co2 causes the ocean surface layers to be relatively saturated so it can't get in to the ocean as fast as it used to. but what's actually happened in the last 12 years is the airborne fraction has plummeted. it's now only about 40%. the other 60% is disappearing. and it's not mostly going in to the ocean. the good fraction of it is being taken up, somehow, by the terrestrial biosphere. of i think that's because the -- we were doubling -- i think we're doubling down on the faustian bargain because we're fertilizing the terrestrial biosphere, both with the co2 in the atmosphere and the combination of that with more nitrogen which will spread in part of -- the nitrogen is being spread around by these aerosols which china and india are putting out and its actua
that that causes, particularly in an era where rising demand for petroleum in china and india and elsewhere is creating potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize that transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum where the prices are set on the world market. canada and norway have been net petroleum exporters, but they pay in those countries the same market price for a gallon of gasoline as we do. so you must diversify, and that includes electrification of short-haul transportation, light-duty trucks and vehicles, and the adoption of natural gas either in its lick if i quide or compressed forms for heavy-duty vehicles and over the road vehicles. but taken as a whole if the recommendations of the eslc are adopted, the united states has the potential to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum and thereby reduce our national security risk to improve our balance of payments and about half of our balance of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our d
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate disc over time. if you look at china in particular, they are now looking at corporate bonds and alternative investments within u.s. treasury securities because they don't like what they see and understandably so. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble in my view is the reason the fed is doing a kissimmee and it was changed to where they have to be concerned with short-term employment. in the absence of the deck unsustainable over time. >> the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world occurred in canada in the mid-1990s. i frankly asked canadian politicians, how did she do it? because the public wind from cheering on spending two and a set deficits within a matter of a year or two so that governments in canada now with some peril if they don't balance the budget. the answer you most frequently to do so they have to do was say that 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill and the canadian debt. the public immediately realized i was not a great idea and became
opened three weeks ago in india. and in china, it's going to be the second biggest market for starbucks by 2014. they're going to have 1,500 stores in 70 cities in china in the next three years. >> and let's be clear about the fiscal cliff. i mean, the near-term impact is bad, right? a lot of people think it would be a recession, but lasting long-term impact, it would lower deficits, you know, and would cut into -- so -- >> dramatically. >> so this isn't the way to go about it. you want to scalp a hatchet, as i keep saying. but companies are trying to make long-term plans, even though near term they're very concerned about what's going on. >>> apple stock dropped more than 6% yesterday. watch that? shares down a little bit in premarket trading this morning. there are a few factors that traders suspect drove the selling. today there's another hearing in the patent case with samsung in california and a research report generated buzz that apple's tablet competitors could eat into its market share. apple shares were up 33% so far this year, right? so if somebody's taking some profits, they'
tougher sanctions on north korea but without support from china, options could be limited. this is video from overnight of the celebrations in north korea after the successful rocket launch. many countries believe it is north korea's way of testing its long-range ballistic missile technology. of course, the united states is very concerned about north korea's weapons capabilities this year. robert gates said north korea was within five years of being able to strike the continental united states. the white house condemns the missil launch calling it a highly provocative act that could impact stability in the region. alison burns, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> pope benedict really 16 is now part of the -- pope benedict is now part of the twitter nation. he already has more than 1 million followers who will read miss messages in english, arabic, polish and four other languages. >>> 8:16. pavi shankar has died at the age of 92. boy. he was good. he was known as the good father the world music. in fact -- known as the godfather of world music. in fact, the beatles gave him that name. he continued t
china is a big user. it is like any commodity. host: mr. sieminski, what are the major renewable energy source available to be developed in the eastern u.s., and how do we get them to get started? guest: the eastern united states energy resources, in the east coast of the u.s., we now have discovered there is a lot of natural gas. it basically starts in west virginia and runs up into pennsylvania and up into new york state. if we go back the last 100 years, pennsylvania and west virginia have been big producers of coal in the u.s. the oil industry started, the first well was drilled in pennsylvania back in 1859. the wind resources along the east coast, are being developed as well pro. probably the most exciting thing being developed in the east coast is a possibility there --uld b host: on the same question of what is out there, what is the u.s. energy independence status if all the offshore oil and anwar are included? guest: it goes to the answer that frank gave. all of the oil in the united states does not belong to the federal government. oil offshore generally falls under the federa
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)